FACULTY OF ECONOMIC AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCESPOLITICAL SCIENCE AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION


ADM 2122-HISTORY OF POLITICAL THOUGHT II

Middle East Technical University                                                                              Spring 2012
Department of Political Science and Public Administration

 

 

 

ADM 2122

HISTORY OF POLITICAL THOUGHT II

Section 3

Tuesday 11:40 am to 14:30 pm. F14

Instructor: Dr. Ömür Birler

Office: A310

Phone:x 2002

E-mail: birler@metu.edu.tr

Office Hours: Thursday 2 to 4 pm.

 

 

Course Description

 

This course is the second part of an investigation in the history of political thought. Similar to its first part, it involves a close reading of the texts that are decisive in the formation of modern Western consciousness. In the examination of these texts, we will seek to understand the emergence of the modern political concepts: e.g., the state, the nation, the public sphere, democracy, human rights. Some of the most fundamental shifts, which define modernity, affect the framework in which political thought is cast; we will try to identify these shifts, and situate some of the main authors/ideas of the Western canon in relation to them.

 

Course Requirements and Grading

 

1- Attendance and participation in class discussions:             10%

 

The class format is centered on lectures and on in-class discussions. Regular attendance and participation are required. Students must have completed the reading listed for each session before the class.

 

2- Two mid-term exam:                                                          25% each

1st Mid-term Exam                                                      March 25, 2013

2nd Mid-Term Exam                                                    April 22, 2013

 

3-Final Exam:                                                                          40% (TBA)

 

 

Required Readings:

 

Machiavelli, N The Prince (University of Chicago)

Descartes, R.               Discourse on the Method (Oxford)

Hobbes, T                    Leviathan (Penguin Books)

Rousseau, J. J.             On The Social Contract (Hackett)

Marx, E.                      The Marx-Engels Reader (Norton)

Nietzsche, F                Untimely Meditations (Cambridge)

 

Schedule of Classes

February 20: Transformation from Ancients to Moderns

Introductory remarks

 

February 27: Machiavelli and Virtu

Machiavelli, N.            The Prince                                           Chap.1-14.

 

March 6: Machiavelli and Fortuna

Machiavelli, N.            The Prince                                           Chap: 15-26.

 

March 13: Method?

Descartes, R.               Discourse on the Method                    Chap: 1-3

 

March 20: Cogito Ergo Sum

Descartes, R.               Discourse on the Method                    Chap: 4-6

 

March 27: Method I: the Art of Men

Hobbes, T.                   Leviathan                                            Chap: 1-6

 

April 3: The Social Contract I: Method

Hobbes, T.                   Leviathan                                            Chap: 13-21

 

April 10: Method II: The General Will of Men

Rousseau, J. J.             On the Social Contract                        Chap: 1-2

 

April 17: The Social Contract II: Method

Rousseau, J. J.             On the Social Contract                        Chap : 3-4

 

April 24: Method III: History

Marx, K.                      The Marx-Engels Reader

                                    “The German Ideology”                     pp: 146-200

 

May 1: LABOR DAY- NO CLASS

 

May 8: Method III: History cont’d.

Marx, K.                      The Marx-Engels Reader

                                    “The German Ideology”                     pp: 146-200

 

May 15: Method IV: Genealogy

Nietzsche, F.               Untimely Meditations

                                    “On the Uses and Abuses of History for Life”                      pp: 59- 87

 

May 22: Method IV: Genealogy cont’d.

Nietzsche, F.               Untimely Meditations

                                    “On the Uses and Abuses of History for Life”                      pp: 88-123

 

May 24: Concluding Remarks