FACULTY OF ECONOMIC AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCESPOLITICAL SCIENCE AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION


ADM 2132 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT

Middle East Technical University

Department of Political Science and Public Administration

Academic Year 2012-2013 Spring Semester

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Pınar Akçalı (Section 01) Room Number: 301 (Building A)

Office Hours: Thursdays, 13.40-15.30 (other hours by appointment)

E-mail: akcali@metu.edu.tr

 

ADM 2132 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT

 

COURSE OUTLINE

 

PART I: GENERAL INTRODUCTION (Weeks 1-2: 14-21 February 2013)

 

1)      What is Comparative Government?

2)      What is a Typology?

3)      Forms of the State: Unitary, Federal and Confederal Types

4)      Forms of the Executive: Parliamentary, Presidential and Dual Executives 

 

Readings:

 

Jean Blondel, “The importance and scope of comparative government,” in Comparative Government: An Introduction, Jean Blondel, Great Britain: Philip Allan, 1990, pp.3-11.

 

Alan Siaroff, “Institutional variations of democracies,” in Comparing Political Regimes: A Thematic Introduction, Alan Siaroff, Canada: Broadview Press, 2005, pp.141-171.

 

Arend Lijphart, “Introduction,” in Parliamentary versus Presidential Government, Arend Lijphart (Ed.), Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992, pp.1-47.

 

PART II: CASE STUDIES (Weeks 3-14)

 

  1. The United States of America (28 February-14 March 2013)

 

Readings:

 

Austin Ranney and Thad Kousser, “Politics in the United States,” in Comparative Politics Today: A World View, Gabriel A. Almond, G. Bingham Powell, Russell J. Dalton, and Kaare Strom (Eds.), 2008, pp.712-754 (Chapter 19).

 

Charles Hauss, “The United States,” in Comparative Politics: Domestic Responses to Global Challenges,” Charles Hauss, USA: Wadsworth, 2009, pp.48-67 (Chapter 3).

 

  1. Great Britain (21 March-4 April 2013)

 

Readings:

 

Richard Rose, “Politics in England,” in Gabriel A. Almond, G. Bingham Powell, Russell J. Dalton and Kaare Strom (Eds.), Comparative Politics Today: A World View, 2008, pp.152-201 (Chapter 8).

 

Charles Hauss, “Great Britain,” in Comparative Politics: Domestic Responses to Global Challenges,” Charles Hauss, USA: Wadsworth, 2009, pp.68-103 (Chapter 4).

 

 

  1. France (11-25 April 2013)

 

Readings:

 

Martin A. Schain, “Politics in France,” in Gabriel A. Almond, G. Bingham Powell, Russell J. Dalton, and Kaare Strom (Eds.), Comparative Politics Today: A World View, 2008, pp. 202-255 (Chapter 9).

 

Charles Hauss, “France,” in Comparative Politics: Domestic Responses to Global Challenges,” Charles Hauss, USA: Wadsworth, 2009, pp.104-139 (Chapter 5).

 

 

  1. The Russian Federation (2-16 May 2013)

 

Readings:

 

Thomas F. Remington, “Politics in Russia,” in Gabriel A. Almond, G. Bingham Powell, Russell J. Dalton, and Kaare Strom (Eds.), Comparative Politics Today: A World View, 2008, pp. 358-405 (Chapter 12).

 

Charles Hauss, “Russia,” in Comparative Politics: Domestic Responses to Global Challenges,” Charles Hauss, USA: Wadsworth, 2009, pp.220-259 (Chapter 9).

 

** Please note that there will be no class on 24 May 2013, as on that day Tuesday’s schedule will be applied!!!

 

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

 

1)      First Midterm: 25% of your grade (date: 25 March 2013, at 17.40, topics include Part I and the United States of America).

 

2)      Second Midterm: 25% of your grade (date: 13 May 2013 at 17.40, topics include Great Britain and France).

 

3)      Final Exam: 40% of your grade (date to be announced later, topics include mostly Russia but all the other topics discussed during the term will also be included).

 

4)      Attendance: 10% of your grade (checked from time to time by sign-up sheets, if you are not in the class and someone else signs your name, then you will both get zero).

 

5)      Optional term paper: instead of the second midterm, you can choose to prepare a term paper of about 10-15 pages (double-spaced) making up 25 % of your grade. Please note that the paper should be submitted to the “Turnitin Plagiarism Prevention Program” (the information about this program will be provided later). If you decide to prepare a term paper, you should inform the instructor and discuss the topic by the end of March.  

 

6)      The students are advised to check their e-mails given by the Computer Services of METU that uses your student ID number on a regular basis, as most of the announcements (such as the exam results) will be made by the “METU Online System” which uses this e-mail account.