FACULTY OF ECONOMIC AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCESPOLITICAL SCIENCE AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION


ADM 3204 - Public Policy: Public Praxis or the State at Work

Course outline – ADM 3204

“Public Policy: Public Praxis or the State at Work”

(2012-2013 Spring Semester)

 

 

 

Dr. Mustafa Kemal Bayırbağ

 

Room Number: A-313

Telephone: 2102027

e-mail: bayirbag@metu.edu.tr 

 

Schedule: Wednesday, 13:40 - 16:30

      FZ17, FEAS Building A

 

Office hours: Tuesday: 10:40-12:30

                       

 

 

 

I - Course Objective

 

 

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the literature on Public Policy and to help you  develop a refined approach to the working of the government. In other words, we are interested in the state at work. The course, first, justifies the need to study public policy and gives a broader overview of what the terms ‘policy process’ and ‘policy analysis’ stand for. In doing so, it also concentrates on existing theories of the policy process. Next, we will have a closer look at the policy-making and formation process. In particular, we will examine the question of who makes public policy, the patterns of participation to policy-making, as well as the role played by institutions in this process, as facilitators or obstacles. Finally, we will discuss the instruments of public policy adopted by the government during the policy process. Especially, ‘regulation’ and the ‘fiscal instruments’ of public policy will constitute the centre of our concern. You are expected to take three in-class examinations (theoretical) and one end-of-the-term project that will investigate a concrete policy problem.

 

 

II - Teaching Policy

 

 

A friendly and positive teaching environment is preferred. I like to promote an atmosphere of mutual trust and vivid intellectual engagement. Cheating is not welcome and in no way accepted. Please try your best to add to the class with your own intellectual capacity. If you need any extra equipment or measure that will facilitate and ease your learning process, please let me know in advance. If you have health problems that will not let you attend the class or any exam, contact me as soon as possible. Please also note that I personally donot sympathise with giving extensions or make-ups unless there is a very good excuse.

 

 

    

III- Student Responsibilities and the Marking Scheme

 

 

The course will help you operationalise the above mentioned insights a) by asking you to write three in-class mid-term examinations that will concentrate on the course readings and in-class discussions, b) and to prepare a final report, which will blend the theoretical insights from the course with empirical research, as well as a certain amount of extra literature survey pertinent to the policy field you will have chosen; c) And, your active contribution to the classroom discussions, and thus attendance is crucial! Students are expected to come to the class prepared, meaning that you will have read the assigned materials to be able to follow the lectures and discussions. You are encouraged to participate in the class discussions.

 

And, here are the assignment details:

 

a) Participation - % 10

 

- Attendance, preparedness to the classroom discussions, the quality of your engagement

 

b) Midterm examinations (three in-class exams: 15% each) - % 45

 

- You will take three in-class examinations (Week 5, Week 9, Week 13)

- 2 pages long each  

- Will concentrate on course readings and in-class discussions. So, course attendance is essential.

 

c) Final Paper - % 45  

 

- Details to be explained in the classroom (10-12 pages, excluding the bibliography, double spaced)

- Topics introduced during the 2nd week (and you will inform the instructor about the topic chosen, during week 3)

- Involves the submission of a one-page research project outline (Week 7)

- Focuses on the Turkish case (or your country’s example)

- Submitted at the final date announced by the president’s office

 

 

IV - Examination and Presentation Evaluation Policy:

(the average of three evaluation criteria)

 

a)  Knowledge of the Literature : Breadth and Scope of your discussion. Allusion to reading materials, proper citations from the authors.

 

b) Insight or In Depth Analysis : Awareness of main issues, tensions, concepts, and efficiency in their operationalisation.

 

c) Engagement : Well researched / presented, good examples, innovative thinking and original contributions.

 

Note: METU marking scale will be used as the term grades are calculated (no curve method).

 

 

 

 

V - Topics and Readings

(Supplementary readings listed in the last section of the outline)

 

 

WEEK 1: Introduction

 

Course outline, main problematic and the concepts introduced.

 

 

 

WEEK 2: What is public policy? Why do we study public policy?

 

THE FINAL PAPER TOPICS INTRODUCED

 

- Dye, Thomas R. (1984) Understanding Public Policy: 1-17.

 

- Pal, Leslie (1989) Public Policy Analysis: 2-18.

 

- Ham, Christopher and Michael Hill (1984) The Policy Process in the Modern Capitalist State: 1-21.

 

- Hogwood, Brian M. and Lewis A. Gunn (1984) Policy Analysis for the Real World: 12-31.

 

 

 

WEEK 3: What is public policy analysis? Intellectual roots and models; Who is a policy analyst?

 

FINAL PAPER TOPICS SELECTED

 

 

- Jenkins, Bill (1993) “Policy Analysis: Models and Approaches”,in Michael Hill (ed) The Policy Process: A Reader: 34-44.

 

- Pal, Leslie (1989) Public Policy Analysis: 19-42.

 

- Friedmann, John (1987) Planning in the Public Domain: from knowledge to action: 137-179.

 

 

WEEK 4: Theories of the Policy Process; the state, society and public policy;

 

- Ham, Christopher and Michael Hill (1984) The Policy Process in the Modern Capitalist State: 22-44.

 

- Dye, Thomas R. (1984) Understanding Public Policy: 19-43.

 

- Hofferbert, Richard I. (1974) The Study of Public Policy: 258-269.

 

 

WEEK 5: Are we inside or outside the blackbox? Agenda formation, politics and decision-making, policy/epistemic communities

 

MID-TERM EXAMINATION 1 (15%)

 

- Dye, Thomas R. (1984) Understanding Public Policy: 317-341.

 

- Adler, Emanuel and Peter M. Haas (1992) “Conclusion: epistemic communities, world order, and the creation of a reflective research program” International Organization 46(1): 367-390.

 

- Goodin, Robert E, Martin Rein and Michael Moran (2006) “The Public and its Policies” in Michael Moran Martin Rein and Robert E Goodin (eds) The Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, OUP: 3-35.

 

 

WEEK 6: Are we inside or outside the blackbox? Continued ...

 

A SHORT LECTURE ON HOW TO PRODUCE AN ACADEMIC PAPER, AND HOW TO CONDUCT RESEARCH

 

 

- Thatcher, Mark (1998) “The Development of Policy Network Analyses” Journal of Theoretical Politics 10(4): 389-416.

 

- Galston, William A (2006) “Political Feasibility: Interests and Power” in Michael Moran Martin Rein and Robert E Goodin (eds) The Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, OUP: 543-556.

 

- Majone, Giandomenico (2006) “Agenda Setting” in Michael Moran Martin Rein and Robert E Goodin (eds) The Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, OUP: 228-250.

 

 

 

WEEK 7: The question of institutions and public policy

 

THE RESEARH PROJECT OUTLINE SUBMISSION (1 PAGE)

 

 

- Weaver, R. Kent and Bert A. Rockman (1993) “Assessing the Effects of Institutions” in R. Kent Weaver and Bert A. Rockman (eds) Do Institutions Matter? Government Capabilities in the United States and Abroad, Washington: Brookings Inst.: 1-41.

 

- Weiss, Linda (1998) The Myth of the Powerless State: 1-40.

 

- Immergut (2006) “Institutional Constraints on Policy” in Michael Moran Martin Rein and Robert E Goodin (eds) The Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, OUP: 557-571.

 

 

 

 

WEEK 8: The question of institutions and public policy. Continued ...

 

 

- Rhodes, R.A.W. (2000) “The Governance Narrative: Key Findings and Lessons from the ESRC’s Whitehall Programme” Public Administration 78(2): 345-363

 

- Ham, Christopher and Michael Hill (1984) The Policy Process in the Modern Capitalist State: 45-60.

 

- Aucoin, Peter (1993) “Politicians, Public Servants, and Public Management: Getting Government Right” in B.G. Peters and D.J. Savoie (eds) Governance in a Changing Environment: 113-137.

 

 

 

WEEK 9: Introduction to policy instruments: policy implementation and the instrument selection process

 

MID-TERM EXAMINATION 2 (15%)

 

- Mazmanian, Daniel A and  Paul A Sabatier (1989) Implementation and Public Policy, University Press of America: 18-48.

 

- Linder, Stephen H. and  B. Guy Peters (1989) “Instruments of Government: perceptions and Contexts” Journal of Public Policy 9(1): 35-58.

 

- Howlett, Michael and M. Ramesh (1993) “Patterns of Policy Instrument Choice: Policy Styles, Policy Learning and the Privatization Experience” Policy Studies Review 12(1/2): 3-24 

 

 

WEEK 10: Changing policy context and policy instruments

 

 

- Bressers, Hans TH. A. And Laurence J. O’Toole, Jr. (1998) “The selection of Policy Instruments: a Network-based Perspective” Journal of Public Policy 18(3): 213-239.

 

- Howlett, Michael (2000) “Managing the ‘Hollow State’: Procedural Policy Instruments and Modern Governance” Canadian Public Administration

 

 

WEEK 11: Instruments of public policy: regulation

 

 

- Doern, G. Bruce (1979) “Regulatory Processes and Regulatory Agencies” in G. Bruce Doern and Peter Aucoin (eds) Public Policy in Canada: 158-189.

 

- Scott, Colin (2006) “Privatization and Regulatory Regimes” in Michael Moran Martin Rein and Robert E Goodin (eds) The Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, OUP: 651-668.

 

- Doern, Bruce G and Robert Johnson (2006) “Multilevel Regulatory Governance: Concepts, Context and Key Issues” in Bruce G Doern and Robert Johnson (eds) Rules, Rules, Rules, Rules: Multilevel Regulatory Governance, UTP: 3-26.

 

- Doern, Bruce G and Robert Johnson (2006) “Conclusions” in Bruce G Doern and Robert Johnson (eds) Rules, Rules, Rules, Rules: Multilevel Regulatory Governance, UTP: 348-368.

 

 

 

WEEK 12: Fiscal instruments of public policy: budget, public spending, and taxation (1)

 

 

- Wildavsky, Aaron (1979) The Politics of the Budgetary Process (Third Edition): 1-5

 

- Mullard, Maurice (1993) Politics and Public Expenditure, Routledge: 42-67.

 

- Savoie, Donald (1990) The Politics of Public Spending in Canada, Toronto: UTP: Chapter 13.

 

 

 

WEEK 13: Fiscal instruments of public policy: budget, public spending, and taxation (2)

 

MID-TERM EXAMINATION 3 (15%)

 

 

- Hyman, David N. (1983) Public Finance:A Contemporary Application of Theory to Policy, The Dryden Press: 348-375.

 

- Goode, Richard (1984) Government Finance in Developing Countries, The Brookings Institution: 75-100.

 

 

WEEK 14: Review (We will go over the course material especially to help you with the preparation process of your final paper).

 

 

 

 

 

 

FINAL PAPER SUBMISSION (see the explanation under III (c))

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS:

 

 

Brenner, Neil (2009). “A thousand leaves”, Leviathan Undone?: Towards a Political Economy of Scale, (Ed. Rianne Mahon ve Roger Keil). UBC Press.

Deleon, Peter (1994). “Reinventing the policy sciences: Three steps back to the future”, Policy Sciences, 27(1), pp. 77-95.

Della Sala, Vincent (2001). “Governance of Politics without a Centre”, Who is Afraid of the State?, (Ed. Gordon Smith ve David Wolfish), Toronto: Toronto University Press, pp. 133-162.

Dye, Thomas R. (2013). Understanding Public Policy, 14th edition, Pearson.

Fischer, Frank ve Miller, Gerald J. (2006). Handbook of Public Policy Analysis: Theory, Politics, and Methods, CRC Press.

Goodin, Robert E; Rein, Martin ve Moran, Michael (Ed.) (2006). The Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, Oxford: OUP.

Hill, Michael (2005). The Public Policy Process, Addison-Wesley Longman Limited

Hill, Michael ve Peter Hupe (2009). Implementing Public Policy, 2nd edition, Sage.

Jessop, Bob (2002). “Time and Space in the Globalization of Capital and Their Implications for State Power”, Rethinking Marxism, 14(1), pp. 97-117

Jessop, Bob (2008). State Power,Cambridge: Polity.

Knoepfel, Peter; Larrue, Corinne Larrue, Varone, Frederic ve Hill, Michael (2011). Public Policy Analysis, Policy Press.

Lipsky, Michael (1980). Street-Level Bureaucracy: Dilemmas of the Individual in Public Services, Russell Sage Foundation.

Mahon, Rianne; Andrew, Caroline ve Johnson, Robert (2007). “Policy Analysis in an Era of ‘Globalization’: Capturing Spatial Dimensions and Scalar Strategies”, Critical Policy Studies, (Ed. Michael Orsini ve Miriam Smith), Vancouver: UBC Press, pp. 41-64.

Orsini, Michael ve Smith, Miriam (2007). “Critical Policy Studies”, Critical Policy Studies, (Ed. Michael Orsini ve Miriam Smith), Vancouver: UBC Press, pp. 1-16.

Pal, Leslie (2010). Beyond Public Policy Analysis: Public Issue Management in Turbulent Times, 4th edition, Scarborough, Ontario: ITP Nelson.

Parsons, Wayne (1996). Public policy: An Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Policy Analysis, Edward-Elgar.

Peck, Jamie (2002). “Political Economies of Scale: Fast Policy, Interscalar Relations, and Neoliberal Workfare”, Economic Geography, 78, pp. 331–336.

Peck, Jamie ve Tickell, Adam (2002). “Neoliberalizing Space”, Antipode, 34, pp. 380–404.

Poulantzas, Nicos (1978), State Power Socialism, Verso.

Sabatier, Paul A. (1991). “Toward Better Theories of the Policy Process”, PS: Political Science and Politics, 24(2), pp. 147-156.

Stoker, Gerry (1998). “Governance as Theory: Five propositions”, International Social Science Journal, 50(115), pp. 17-28.

Thissen, Wil A. ve Walker, Warren E. (Ed.) (2013). Public Policy Analysis: New Developments, Springer.

Ukeles, Jacob B. (1977). “Policy Analysis: Myth or Reality?”, Public Administration Review , 37(3), pp. 223-228.