FACULTY OF ECONOMIC AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCESPOLITICAL SCIENCE AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION


ADM 4182 CURRENT ISSUES IN CENTRAL ASIAN POLITICS

Middle East Technical University

Department of Political Science and Public Administration

Academic Year 2012-2013 Spring Semester

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Pınar Akçalı

Room Number: 301 (Building A)

Office Hours: Thursdays, 13.40-15.30 (other hours by appointment)

E-mail: akcali@metu.edu.tr

 

 

ADM 4182 CURRENT ISSUES IN CENTRAL ASIAN POLITICS

 

Course Description

 

This course aims to analyze the five countries of Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan) both from historical (pre-Soviet and Soviet) and recent (post-Soviet) perspectives. In the introductory part of the course, first, general geographical conditions of the region are discussed; then some of the most important historical developments that affected the region until the establishment of the five SSRs (Soviet Socialist Republics) are discussed. In the second part, the common economic, political and social conditions that shaped these five countries during the Soviet era will be dealt with. The third part separately looks at these republics in the post-Soviet era, by focusing on their differences as well as similarities. In the final part, the region is analyzed within a regional and global perspective.   

 

Course Outline

 

 

Part I General Introduction: Geographic Conditions and History of Central Asia (18 February-4 March 2013)

 

 

Week 1: Central Asia as a ‘New Region’ (18 February 2013)

 

Ahmed Rashid, Jihad: the Rise of Militant Islam in Central Asia, New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002, pp. 15-31 (Chapter 2).

 

Michael Kort, Central Asian Republics, New York: Facts on File, Inc., 2004, pp. 3-16 (Chapter 1).

 

Rafis Abazov, Culture and Customs of the Central Asian Republics, USA: The Greenwood Press, 2007, pp. 1-22 (from the Introduction).

 

 

Weeks 2-3: Historical Background (25 February-4 March 2013)

 

Michael Kort, Central Asian Republics, New York: Facts on File, Inc., 2004, pp. 17-31 (Chapter 2), pp. 32-43 (Chapter 3), pp. 44-63 (Chapter 4), pp. 64-72 (Chapter 5), and pp. 73-82 (Chapter 6).

 

Rafis Abazov, Culture and Customs of the Central Asian Republics, USA: The Greenwood Press, 2007, pp. 22-57 (rest of the Introduction).

 

Part II Common Factors in Central Asia (11 March-1 April 2013)

 

Week 4: Economic Structure (11 March 2013)

 

Michael Rywkin, Moscow’s Muslim Challenge, New York: M. E. Sharpe, 1990, pp. 44-57 (Chapter 4).

 

Michael Rywkin, Moscow’s Muslim Challenge, New York: M. E. Sharpe, 1990, pp. 107-120 (Chapter 8).

 

Alex Stringer, “Soviet Development in Central Asia: The Classic Colonial Syndrome?” in Central Asia: Aspects of Transition, Tom Everett-Heath (ed.) London: RoutledgeCurzon, 2003, pp.146-166 (Chapter 8).

 

Richard Pomfret, The Central Asian Economies Since Independence, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 2006, pp. 1-22.

 

Sergej Mahnovski, Kamil Akramov, and Theodore Karasik, Economic Dimensions of Security in Central Asia, USA: Rand, 2007, pp.51-62.

 

Gül Berna Özcan, Building States and Markets: Enterprise and Development in Central Asia, Great Britain: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010, pp. 30-58.

 

 Week 5: Political Structure (18 March 2013)

 

Roger D. Kangas, “State-building and Civil Society in Central Asia,” in Vladimir Tismeneanu (ed.) Political Culture and Civil Society in Russia and the New States of Eurasia, New York: M. E. Sharpe Inc., 1995, pp. 271-91 (Chapter 10).

 

Patricia M. Carley, “The Legacy of Soviet Political System and the Prospects for Developing Civil Society in Central Asia,” in Vladimir Tismeneanu (ed.) Political Culture and Civil Society in Russia and the New States of Eurasia, New York: M. E. Sharpe Inc., 1995, pp. 292-317 (Chapter 11).

 

Stephan White, “Rethinking Postcommunist Transition,” Government and Opposition, 2003, Vol. 28, No. 4, pp.417-135.

 

David C. Brooker, “How They Leave: A Comparison of How the First Presidents of the Soviet Successor States Left Office,” Journal of Communist Studies and Transition Politics,” 2004, Vol: 20, No: 4, pp. 61-78. 

 

Week 6: Social Structure I: Islam in Central Asia (25 March 2013)

 

Ahmed Rashid, Jihad: the Rise of Militant Islam in Central Asia, New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002, pp. 32-56 (Chapter 3).

 

Rafis Abazov Culture and Customs of the Central Asian Republics, USA: The Greenwood Press, 2007, pp. 59-78 (Chapter 2).

 

Galina Yemelianova, Radical Islam in the Former Soviet Union, New York: Routledge, 2010, pp. 11-30 (Chapter 1) and 211-243.

 

 

 

Week 7: Social Structure II: Nations and Clans in Central Asia (1 April 2013)

 

Oliver Roy, The New Central Asia: the Creation of Nations, London: I. B. Tauris, 2000, pp. 161-189 (Chapter 9).

 

Katleen Collins, “The Political Role of Clans in Central Asia,” Comparative Politics, 2003, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp.171-189.

 

Tom Everett-Heath, “Instability and Identity in A Post-Soviet World: Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan,” in Central Asia: Aspects of Transition, Tom Everett-Heath (ed.) London: RoutledgeCurzon, 2003, pp.181-204 (Chapter 10).

 

 

Week 8: Midterm Exam (8 April 2013)

 

Part III Individual Republics (15 April-13 May 2013)

 

Week 9: Kazakhstan (15 April 2013)

 

Michael Kort, Central Asian Republics, New York: Facts on File, Inc., 2004, pp. 85-111 (Chapter 7).

 

Wojciech Ostrowski, Politics and Oil in Kazakhstan, New York: Routledge, 2010, pp.127-149 (Chapter 7).

 

Week 10: Uzbekistan (22 April 2013)

 

Michael Kort, Central Asian Republics, New York: Facts on File, Inc., 2004, pp. 112-135 (Chapter 8).

 

Shahram Akbarzadeh, Uzbekistan and the United States, USA: Zed Books, 2005, pp. 7-23 (Chapter 1).

 

Week 11: Turkmenistan (29 April 2013)

 

Michael Kort, Central Asian Republics, New York: Facts on File, Inc., 2004, pp. 136-148 (Chapter 9).

 

Luca Anceschi, Turkmenistan’s Foreign Policy: Positive Neutrality and the Consolidation of the Turkmen Regime, 2009, pp.32-60 (Chapter 2).

 

 

Week 12: Kyrgyzstan (6 May 2013)

 

Michael Kort, Central Asian Republics, New York: Facts on File, Inc., 2004, pp. 149-163 (Chapter 10).

 

Bermet Tursunkulova, “The Power of the Precedent?” Central Asian Survey, 2008, Vol. 27, Nos: 3-4, pp.349-362.

 

Aurelie Biard, “The Religious Factor in the Reification of the ‘Neo-Ethnic’ Identities in Kyrgyzstan,” Nationalities Paper, 2010, Vol. 38, No: 3, pp.323-335.

 

 

Week 13: Tajikistan (13 May 2013)

 

Michael Kort, Central Asian Republics, New York: Facts on File, Inc., 2004, pp. 164-177 (Chapter 11).

 

Lena Jonson, Tajikistan and the New Central Asia: Great Power Rivalry and Radical Islam, London: I. B. Tauris, 2006, pp.127-149.

 

 

Part IV Central Asia and the World: (20 May 2013)

 

 

Week 14: The New Great Game and Its Players

 

Rajan Menon, “Introduction: Central Asia in the Twenty-First Century,” in Central Asia: Views from Washington, Moscow and Beijing, Eugene Rumer, Dmitri Trenin and Huasheng Zhao (eds.), New York: M.E. Sharpe, 2007, pp. 3-17.

 

Gregory Gleason and Zhang Jiadong, “Central Asian States and Policy Triangles: China, Russia, and the United States,” in The United States, Russia and China: Confronting Global Terrorism and Security Challenges in the 21st Century, Pual J. Bolt, Su Changhe, and Sharyl Cross (eds.), USA: Praeger Security International, 2008, pp.139-157.

 

Erica Marat, The Military and the State in Central Asia: From Red Army to Independence, New York: Routledge, 2010, pp. 81-115 (Chapter 4).

 

Eva Rakel, “Paradigms of Iranian Policy in Central Asia and Beyond,” in Central Eurasia in Global Politics: Conflict, Security and Development, Mehdi Parvizi and Henk Houweling (eds.), Leiden: Brill, 2004, pp. 235-257 (Chapter 9).

 

Igor Torbakov, “Turkey and Post-Soviet Eurasia: Seeking A Regional Power Status,” in Prospects for Democracy in Central Asia, Birgit N. Schlyter (ed.), Sweden: Alfa Print, 2005, pp. 117-128.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Requirements

 

 

1)  

Midterm Exam, 20% of your grade (open-book in-class exam to be held on 8 April 2013, at 9.40; topics include Parts 1 & 2).

 

2)  

One term paper, 30% of your grade.

 

Please note that the paper should be 10-15 pages long, double-spaced, and must be submitted to the “Turnitin Plagiarism Prevention Program.” The information about this program will be provided later. The topic of the paper will be decided by the student and discussed with the instructor. It is highly recommended that you choose your topic as early as possible. Please note that the deadline for the paper is 6 May 2013. For the EAS students, the paper should be 15-20 pages long, double-spaced, and must also be submitted to the “Turnitin Plagiarism Program.” 

 

3)  

Final exam, 40% of your grade.

 

4)  

Attendance: 10% of your grade.

 

5)  

The students are advised to check their e-mails given by the Computer Services of METU (the one using your student ID numbers) on a regular basis, as most of the announcements (such as the exam results) will be made by the METU Online System, which uses this e-mail account.